Three King’s Day (6th January)

Whilst Northern Europeans spend the first few days of the New Year planning the next diet after all the feasting at Christmas time, the Spanish start planning their Christmassy family gatherings and lunches for the 6th January.

Three King’s Day (6th January)

For the Germans it’s gingerbread and spekulatius, for the English it’s the plum pudding and mince pies, for the Swedish it’s the pepperkakor and lussekatter, the total must-eats at the equivalent Christmas days.

Whilst Northern Europeans spend the first few days of the New Year planning the next diet after all the feasting at Christmas time, the Spanish start planning family gatherings and lunches for the 6th January during which it is tradition to serve a yeast bun called “Roscón de Reyes”, containing a lucky charm, who turns he who finds it into the king of the family for that day.

Here is a recipe, if you would like to follow Spanish traditions: Roscón de Reyes . But it is also available in bakeries and supermarkets.

A night before though, Spanish children get super excited for this is the day, that the Three Kings will arrive, who they are eagerly awaiting with their glowing eyes, because they are the ones (not Father Christmas) who’ll be bringing them their Christmas gifts and toys. That afternoon they will drag their parents out of the house and into the cold to await with them the arrival of the Three Holy Kings at Palma’s port and watch their parading through town in carts (an event with some 600 participants) dishing out around 7.000 kg of candy.

It is an event well-worth going to see, even, if you have already stored away your Christmas mood until the end of the year.

Wishing you fun!

Your Mallorca Gold team

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